Laura Sew Stupid
Women are afraid of meeting a serial killer. Men are afraid of meeting someone fat.
When Strangers Click, a 2011 documentary about online dating (via rawfuel)

dutchster:

fat-amy-for-president:

albamentum:

drunktrophywife:

being a girl is really fucking expensive

hahahahhhAHAHAHAHhahahahahhahahah WHO IS PAYING FOR YOUR DATES

hahahahhhAHAHAHAHhahahahahhahahah WHO IS PAYING FOR OUR TAMPONS, PADS, ULTRA SOUNDS, PAP SMEARS, OB/GYN VISITS, BRAS, CLOTHES, MAKE UP, HAIR PRODUCTS TO GO ON DATES WITH FUCKERS LIKE YOU?

[cricket sounds]

I want to fuck on the floor and break shit.

I want to fuck on the floor and break shit.

hungry-horny-feminist:

This girl told me I dressed well for my size today.
Back handed compliments are for insecure 6th grade girls, grow up girl.

hungry-horny-feminist:

This girl told me I dressed well for my size today.

Back handed compliments are for insecure 6th grade girls, grow up girl.

I'm a straight male, mid-twenties and I get very insecure about my body. I love your blog for its depictions of different body types. I have my own preferences of course, but *everything* here tells me that beauty is subjective and opens up my mind to being excited about all sorts of bodies and people beyond what I'm in to, and lets me know someone could easily fantasize about me. The images of men and women are equally hot & relevant to this. I just wanted to say thanks and don't ever change.
Anonymous

sexual-feelings:

thank you so much for this awesome message! i hope you find the confidence in yourself someday because you deserve it.

self portrait by myselfnude

foodorexia:

lets-just-eat:

Homemade Soft Pretzels

More delicious food here!
christiannightmares:


Unlearning Purity Culture: Q&A with the Founder of No Shame Movement

Christian “purity culture,” which promotes the belief that sex outside of heterosexual marriage is sinful and offensive to God, has been covered extensively on this blog, from the bizarre "Push-Ups for Purity" challenge and the Liberty Counsel endorsed Purity Bear (that urges teens to abstain from sex until marriage), to the militaristic Every Man’s Battle for Purity and the unforgettable  “Christian Ladies (Purity Ring On It)”, a parody of the Beyoncé megahit.





But although it’s a somewhat easy (although deserving) target for ridicule, there’s also a very dark and damaging side to purity culture, and many who decide to leave it often struggle with developing a healthy attitude toward sex. So I was glad to recently discover No Shame Movement, which “functions as a platform to share stories of unlearning purity culture.” I caught up with its founder recently to learn more.
How did No Shame Movement come about?No Shame Movement began as a Twitter conversation back in early 2013. I was talking with other “recovering conservative” Christians about Christian bloggers who would lament the damage done by shaming sexual desires, yet at the same time draw the same conclusion: everyone should wait until marriage. In the end, it didn’t seem like they were condemning purity culture, but simply offering a kinder, gentler version. Saying, “Shaming people for sex outside of marriage is bad!” followed by “But still, ummm…wait till marriage, k?” is still enforcing the SAME view of sexuality as purity culture. A subway rat dressed up in a bowtie and top hat is still…a subway rat.

We wanted there to be an alternative to just “reframing” the concept of purity culture, and eventually came up with the hashtag #noshamemov that could serve as a platform for people to share their own stories of being shamed for sexual desires and their journey towards a healthier view of sexuality. This idea was inspired by #girlslikeus, the hashtag started by Janet Mock to empower trans women. 
It also seemed that many posts on purity culture were mostly framed through the perspective of white, straight, cisgender women, and a platform that was more inclusive was necessary. 

Can you talk about what it means to “unlearn purity culture” and why you feel that’s important?First I want to clarify the definition: purity culture holds the view that any kind of sexual behavior (including thoughts) outside of a heterosexual marriage is sin. Unlearning purity culture means developing a view of sexuality that doesn’t include shame for having sexual thoughts or desires, let alone acting on them in a safe, consensual way that respects boundaries. Many who have internalized purity culture constantly feel guilty for every sexual thought that comes into their head, for engaging in self-pleasure, or for being sexually active. These are things that are a part of human nature! 

One of the most commons lessons enforced in purity culture is that your body is not your own, and that when you engage in any physical activities, you’re “dishonoring” your future spouse (assuming, of course, you want to/can legally/can afford to get married). The other most common lesson is that premarital sex is sinful and dirty and will ruin your life and make you miserable. Well, guess what happens when you have premarital sex?  Self-fulfilling prophecy. Instead of dictating what people should do with their bodies, they should be encouraged to make healthy autonomous choices… (Read the full interview on Christian Nightmares Too )

christiannightmares:

Unlearning Purity Culture: Q&A with the Founder of No Shame Movement

Christian “purity culture,” which promotes the belief that sex outside of heterosexual marriage is sinful and offensive to God, has been covered extensively on this blog, from the bizarre "Push-Ups for Purity" challenge and the Liberty Counsel endorsed Purity Bear (that urges teens to abstain from sex until marriage), to the militaristic Every Man’s Battle for Purity and the unforgettable “Christian Ladies (Purity Ring On It)”, a parody of the Beyoncé megahit.

But although it’s a somewhat easy (although deserving) target for ridicule, there’s also a very dark and damaging side to purity culture, and many who decide to leave it often struggle with developing a healthy attitude toward sex. So I was glad to recently discover No Shame Movement, which “functions as a platform to share stories of unlearning purity culture.” I caught up with its founder recently to learn more.

How did No Shame Movement come about?
No Shame Movement began as a Twitter conversation back in early 2013. I was talking with other “recovering conservative” Christians about Christian bloggers who would lament the damage done by shaming sexual desires, yet at the same time draw the same conclusion: everyone should wait until marriage. In the end, it didn’t seem like they were condemning purity culture, but simply offering a kinder, gentler version. Saying, “Shaming people for sex outside of marriage is bad!” followed by “But still, ummm…wait till marriage, k?” is still enforcing the SAME view of sexuality as purity culture. A subway rat dressed up in a bowtie and top hat is still…a subway rat.

We wanted there to be an alternative to just “reframing” the concept of purity culture, and eventually came up with the hashtag #noshamemov that could serve as a platform for people to share their own stories of being shamed for sexual desires and their journey towards a healthier view of sexuality. This idea was inspired by #girlslikeus, the hashtag started by Janet Mock to empower trans women

It also seemed that many posts on purity culture were mostly framed through the perspective of white, straight, cisgender women, and a platform that was more inclusive was necessary. 

Can you talk about what it means to “unlearn purity culture” and why you feel that’s important?
First I want to clarify the definition: purity culture holds the view that any kind of sexual behavior (including thoughts) outside of a heterosexual marriage is sin. Unlearning purity culture means developing a view of sexuality that doesn’t include shame for having sexual thoughts or desires, let alone acting on them in a safe, consensual way that respects boundaries. Many who have internalized purity culture constantly feel guilty for every sexual thought that comes into their head, for engaging in self-pleasure, or for being sexually active. These are things that are a part of human nature! 

One of the most commons lessons enforced in purity culture is that your body is not your own, and that when you engage in any physical activities, you’re “dishonoring” your future spouse (assuming, of course, you want to/can legally/can afford to get married). The other most common lesson is that premarital sex is sinful and dirty and will ruin your life and make you miserable. Well, guess what happens when you have premarital sex?  Self-fulfilling prophecy. Instead of dictating what people should do with their bodies, they should be encouraged to make healthy autonomous choices… (Read the full interview on Christian Nightmares Too )